Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Mommy's Choice Preschool and Infant Care

Home | Curriculum | One-Of-A-Kind | Credentials | Infant Care | Location
25105 Bartholomew Street
Christmas, FL 32709
(407) 486-5911

plastercottage.jpg

How it all began:
I have been a babysitter and/or nanny for twelve years. I absolutely love kids and enjoy every stage of their development. It has been an amazing experience to take part in the lives of so many children. As a nanny, I had always gone to the family's home whose child I was caring for. After my last employers moved, I found it more economical to offer childcare in my home. I understand how challenging it can be to find a good childcare provider. I am a mother to an 8 year-old, 4-year-old and 10-month-old. I have found myself looking for help with the kids and it is a never-ending search. It is so important to find someone whom you can trust; not just to watch your child, but to help with their development. It is important to teach our children and keep their minds stimulated. Opening my home as a safe, loving, nurturing daycare-alternative simply made sense to me. I am now able to help more families find exactly what they need in a childcare provider. What we do today creates who our children will be tomorrow.

greenmeadowsgroupshot.jpg

          BabyCenter
What are the advantages of home daycare?
Many home daycares can boast a small group of children, something most centers can't guarantee. According to the National Association for the Education of Young Children, home daycare providers shouldn't take more than two babies under 30 months, five kids under five, and two additional school-aged children (though they can add more children if they have an assistant). A smaller group means your child is more likely to get the one-on-one interaction he needs and deserves.
The opportunity to play and learn with other children is something both home daycares and centers offer that nanny care can't. But unlike centers, which tend to group kids by age, home daycares usually have mixed-age groups, which more closely mirrors most families and may help your child learn to feel comfortable around older kids. "I like the fact that there are other children my son can play with and learn from," says Cindy Goral, a BabyCenter user from Palo Alto, California. "Since he's an only child, he really enjoys this social interaction."
Though daycare centers, no matter how child-friendly and welcoming, can sometimes seem institutional, home daycare can be the next best thing to your own home. If you're lucky enough to find a good home care provider in your neighborhood, so much the better — your child will feel even more at home.
"My favorite thing about home childcare is that it's a homey environment, and my children get lots of attention and hugs," says Phyllis Hodson-Hutsell, a BabyCenter user from Rossville, Indiana. "Plus, our caregiver is located in the same small town where we live, so she's close by, and my daughters will get to know neighborhood kids whom she'll likely know all her life."
From a practical viewpoint, home care also offers a few things centers can't. A home daycare may be more flexible about pickup and drop-off times and less likely than a center to charge you for every minute you're late. Home daycares also tend to close for fewer holidays than most centers, so you may not have to scramble for last-minute backup care as often.
Finally, most home daycare providers are moms themselves, so you know you're leaving your child with someone familiar with the basics of baby and child care and who probably has a healthy dose of the mothering instinct. Of course, you and your provider may differ on some childrearing issues, but as long as you find someone with whom you share basic care philosophies, the "mom" factor can be a definite advantage.

AmericanBaby.com

Finding The Right Preschool
Home Daycare vs. Preschool
Q. My 3-year-old goes to a home daycare while we work, and she's happy there. But I keep wondering whether we should enroll her in a school or a larger center to give her more of a preschool experience.
A. It really depends on the program, says Amy Flynn, director of the Family Center at Bank Street College of Education in New York City. "If your child has a loving provider who's committed to doing age-appropriate activities with the kids, that's probably fine." It's helpful if the program has other preschool-age children there for your daughter to practice taking turns and sharing with. The home should also have the same kinds of simple materials -- blocks, costumes, art supplies -- you'd see in a preschool classroom.

websiteplaycube.jpg
Contact Me and Start your tour today!

~ Andrea Branagan ~ 25105 Bartholomew Street ~ Christmas, FL ~ (407) 486-5911 ~

daycare4.jpg